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No Rules Rules

No Rules Rules

2020 . Business & Economics, Industries, Leadership . Reed Hastings, Erin Meyer

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17 total

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20K total

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No Rules Rules
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About the book

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The New York Times bestseller Shortlisted for the 2020 Financial Times & McKinsey Business Book of the Year Netflix cofounder Reed Hastings reveals for the first time the unorthodox culture behind one of the world's most innovative, imaginative, and successful companies There has never before been a company like Netflix. It has led nothing short of a revolution in the entertainment industries, generating billions of dollars in annual revenue while capturing the imaginations of hundreds of millions of people in over 190 countries. But to reach these great heights, Netflix, which launched in 1998 as an online DVD rental service, has had to reinvent itself over and over again. This type of unprecedented flexibility would have been impossible without the counterintuitive and radical management principles that cofounder Reed Hastings established from the very beginning. Hastings rejected the conventional wisdom under which other companies operate and defied tradition to instead build a culture focused on freedom and responsibility, one that has allowed Netflix to adapt and innovate as the needs of its members and the world have simultaneously transformed. Hastings set new standards, valuing people over process, emphasizing innovation over efficiency, and giving employees context, not controls. At Netflix, there are no vacation or expense policies. At Netflix, adequate performance gets a generous severance, and hard work is irrel­evant. At Netflix, you don't try to please your boss, you give candid feedback instead. At Netflix, employees don't need approval, and the company pays top of market. When Hastings and his team first devised these unorthodox principles, the implications were unknown and untested. But in just a short period, their methods led to unparalleled speed and boldness, as Netflix quickly became one of the most loved brands in the world. Here for the first time, Hastings and Erin Meyer, bestselling author of The Culture Map and one of the world's most influential business thinkers, dive deep into the controversial ideologies at the heart of the Netflix psyche, which have generated results that are the envy of the business world. Drawing on hundreds of interviews with current and past Netflix employees from around the globe and never-before-told stories of trial and error from Hastings's own career, No Rules Rules is the fascinating and untold account of the philosophy behind one of the world's most innovative, imaginative, and successful companies.

Year:

2020

Language:

English

Publisher:

Diversified Publishing

Pages:

464

ISBN:

0593152387 (ISBN13: 9780593152386)

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Reviews

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Esben Poulsen

1 year ago

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Really like this book. Learned a lot 🤩 Ask anyone at my company, I talk way too much about this book.

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Joen Møller

1 year ago

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One of the best management books I've read. All of the chapters hold some value, every point is insightful and actionable. Would highly recommend.

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Morten Schroeder image

1 year ago

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Super interesting book detailing some of the key principles that the Netflix culture is built on! My one issue (hence the 8) is that it's missing nuance and I would have liked to hear from people who perhaps did NOT enjoy the Netflix culture or did not perform well in this environment. Instead some of the principles are presented as if they are universal no-brainer which I have a hard time believing! Someone's been drinking the Netflix Kool-aid for sure A few things that stuck with me as a founder trying to build my own company: (1) Incentives. People in creative roles should not have performance bonuses as a large part of their pay. These people need to know they can take risks and be creative without risk of losing compensation (2) Radical Candor. Mainly the idea that whatever you say about a coworker behind their back you should also be able to say to them directly (3) Feedback. Getting into the mindset that someone giving you feedback is really them trying to help you become better! (4) Talent. Hiring and attracting talent underpins everything!

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Markus Marañon Straarup image

2 years ago

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This book had a lot going against it for me initially. First of all I didnt know it was a management and culture book. I thought it was the second "chapter" to "That Will Never Work" (which I loved!), so I was expecting the story of how Netflix went digital. Totally my fault for diving in blindly, it literally says culture on the front page. Secondly from Marc's perspective I had not gotten the best impression of Reed, and i thought Marc seemed like a great guy. So... THIS BOOK WAS AMAZING. I am normally not that into management books, but this was a modern masterclass in culture and management in a modern organisation.

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Annie Spencer image

1 year ago

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I liked the concept of this, it was also very digestible, easy to get into and relatively short and punchy. But I was just left thinking there were so many flaws and holes in the arguments made that weren’t addressed, seems to just say ‘do this in your organization now!’ and it didn’t really acknowledge that this style of organization really can’t be applicable to all.

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Anders Knudsen

1 year ago

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The book took off flying and I had the feeling it was going to be a 10 rating. But half way through, it ran out of surprises and “wow” and with 50 pages left I considered to stop. That said - I got really inspired by the way Netflix are running their business, it is really impressive, and I will recommend people to ready the first half of the book.

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Morten Schroeder image

1 year ago

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Does this ACTUALLY sound like a fun place to work? From the Netflix story by Marc Randolph, Reed Hastings sounds like a brilliant but socially challenged person. I can’t help feel that it sounds like Reed has changed everyone into versions of himself where everyone gives each other feedback in situations that at times sound really awkward or uncomfortable. No doubt frequent and honest feedback is great, but surely there’s a limit? Also I find it weird that they ONLY talk about negative feedback and not a single time address providing positive feedback.

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Morten Schroeder image

1 year ago

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I’m going in!! Everyone has been raving about this book 😍

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