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There Will Be Water

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Egypt: We are watching you
2017

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In his 2005 State of the Union address President George W. Bush cites Egypt as the country that will pave the way for democracy in the Middle East. Three women, unable to sit by while their country is on the brink of drastic change, start a grassroots movement to educate and empower the public by raising awareness about the meaning of democracy. They name their campaign Shayfeen.com, which means to “we are watching you.” This film follows the highs and lows of the first year of the movement in Egypt. Insisting that only the people can make change happen, their goal is to educate the Egyptian public on what it takes to build the most basic pillars of democracy: demanding basic human rights, freedom of speech and the establishment of an independent judiciary. Egypt: We are Watching You shows the role ordinary citizens can play in shaping and securing their democracy.
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The Secret Slaves of the Middle East
2016

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How are unskilled workers being trapped and trafficked in the Middle East? Mary Joy Dao-Ay is a Filipino maid who used to be a domestic worker in Lebanon. She left her 3 children in the Philippines, planning to pay for their education by earning a higher salary working in the Middle East. Instead, she was forced to flee for her own safety, and got stuck in Lebanon seeking refuge at a shelter. THE SECRET SLAVES OF THE MIDDLE EAST is the story of Mary Joys’ desperate struggle for justice, in a country with no labour laws protecting foreign domestic workers, and where the special Arab Kafala System renders it impossible for an unskilled worker to leave the country or change their employer. It is the story of how poverty leads unprivileged women from developing countries to be deceived and trafficked into slavery.
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Kumaré
2012 . Documentary

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Is there something real behind spirituality or is it a mere illusion that we create? This is what Vikram Gandhi, an American filmmaker from New Jersey, wants to find out by conducting an experiment. He poses as a guru and attracts a number of devotees, but unexpectedly finds that his followers are receiving genuine benefits from his deception. KUMARE questions the meaning of religion and spirituality through the unconventional story of a supposedly enlightened Indian guru who has come to Arizona to spread his teachings and build a following. After three months in Phoenix, Kumaré has found a group of devoted students who embrace him as a true spiritual teacher. At the height of his popularity, Guru Kumaré must reveal his true identity to his disciples and unveil his greatest teaching of all: he is not real.
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Stealing Africa
2012 . Documentary

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Stealing Africa describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa. The film looks at Rüschlikon, a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the third largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population lives on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film tells the story of global trade where money and natural resources only flow one way.
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Park Avenue: Money, Power & The American Dream
2012 . Documentary

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How much inequality is too much? 740 Park Ave, New York City, is home to some of the wealthiest Americans. Across the Harlem River, 10 minutes to the north, is the other Park Avenue in South Bronx, where more than half the population live on food stamps and children are 20 times more likely to be killed. In the last 30 years, inequality has rocketed in the US -- the American Dream only applies to those with enough money to lobby politicians for friendly bills on Capitol Hill.
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The Vasectomist
2013

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The Vasectomist follows Dr Doug Stein, an urologist from small town Florida on a mission to save the planet by “spreading the gospel of vasectomy”. It is a journey through difficult and divisive issues, crossing cultural, religious and political taboos, which ultimately provokes a new conversation about over-population, over-consumption and the planet’s environmental tipping point.
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Rafea: Solar Mama
2012 . Documentary

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Will an education in solar engineering prove to be a route out of poverty for women in Jordan? Rafea is the second wife of a Bedouin husband. She is selected to attend the Barefoot College in India that takes uneducated middle-aged women from poor communities and trains them to become solar engineers. The college's 6-month programme brings together women from all over the world. Learning about electrical components and soldering without being able to read, write or understand English is the easy part. Witness Rafea's heroic efforts to pull herself and her family out of poverty.
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Detropia
2012 . Documentary

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“Detropia” - a portrait of the economic decline of the city of Detroit - is a 2012 film directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady. With the long-term changes in the automobile industry, Detroit’s residents are affected and a dystopian scenario takes shape, resembling the circumstances of the U.S in 2020. “Please Vote for Me”, follows a mini-experiment in democracy with the first ever elections for class monitor in a 3rd grade class in the city of Wuhan, China. The film invites for a serious examination of the challenges of democratization not only in China, but around the world.
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Please Vote for Me
2007 . Documentary

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Wuhan is a city in central China about the size of London, and it is here that director Weijun Chen has conducted an experiment in democracy. A grade 3 class at Evergreen Primary School has their first encounter with democracy by holding an election to select a Class Monitor. Eight-year-olds compete against each other for the coveted position, abetted and egged on by teachers and doting parents. Elections in China take place only within the Communist Party, but recently millions of Chinese voted in their version of Pop Idol. The purpose of Weijun Chen’s experiment is to determine how, if democracy came to China, it would be received. Is democracy a universal value that fits human nature? Do elections inevitably lead to manipulation? Please Vote for Me is a portrait of a society and a town through a school, its children and its families
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